Tawny Frogmouth
Australian Owls
STOP 3
FROGMOUTHS




Tawney Frogmouth

Location and Habitat
It occurs almost throughout Australia but does not live in rainforests A range of woods etc even down to suburban parks, golfcourses etc.

Description
click for info on pic From place to place it varies markedly in size and colour (ranging from grey to dull rufous) Normally has large yellow eyes heart shaped bill. As with all frogmouths they have a bristly feathered tuft over its bill and an extremely long tongue that is forked

Tawny Frogmouth Activities
It sleeps on branches in the daytime live in pairs that maintain permanent territories some 40 to 80 hectares in extent

Feeding
It usually hunts by pouncing from a low perch, such as a fence post or road sign, onto small terrestrial animals crossing bare open ground (eg Country roads) at dusk and dawn. The chief prey are such arthropods as centipedes, spiders, scorpions and cockroaches, but it also eats frogs, mice and - occasionally - small birds.

Nesting & Breeding
Breeding occurs from August to December and both parents share equally in the duties.. The nest 15 meters or so up is a flimsy platform of sticks, in a tree fork Two white rounded eggs are Incubated for 1 month, and the young fledge at 25 to 35 days.




Marbled Frogmouth

Location and Habitat
This rare species is found in two rainforest areas in eastern Australia. Cape York and on the other found between Gladstone (East coast Queensland) and Lismore in north-east N.S.W. They roost in rainforests with palms.

Description
Marbled Frogmouth This bird is mainly charcoal grey with bright orange eyes. The name comes from the "marbling" patterns that addorn the wings and chest. As with all frogmouths they have a bristly feathered tuft over its bill and an extremely long tongue that is forked Plumed frogmouth is a sub species of the Marbled Frogmouth

Activities
It is thought to live in pairs that maintain permanent territories.

Feeding
It feeds on small animals, such as beetles, spiders and frogs, snatched from the ground or tree trunks.

Nesting & Breeding
Breeding occurs from August to December with both parents incubate and careing for the young. Usually only one egg is laid, in a shallow nest of woven vines and sticks in a fork high ina tree

Dept of Enviroment Marbled Frogmouth - Profile





Papuan Frogmouth

Location and Habitat
north-eastern Australia from Cape York south to the vicinity of Townsville. rainforests to woodlands to swamps to scrub with trees

Description
click here for more info about pic Larger head with cream eyebrows and big red eyes. As with all frogmouths they have a bristly feathered tuft over its bill and an extremely long tongue that is forked Their wings are darker

Activities
It is sedentary, living in pairs that maintain permanent feeding territories of about 20 to 30 hectares

Feeding
They hunt somewhat larger prey.

Nesting & Breeding
Breeding occurs from August to January . The nest a shallow saucer of sticks in a tree fork normally contains just the 1 egg. Both parents help out with all the parental duties



Australian Owlet

Neither an Owl or a Frogmouth, the Australian Owlet is in acutal fact a "Nightjar" but because of its "Owl like" looks and being Australias most widespread nocturnal bird, I have included it

Location and Habitat
Found throughout Australia, it lives in any woodlands with tree hollows. click for info on pic

Description
Small brown eye "owl looking bird" with a black bill. Its large head has wide black eye-stripes meeting behind and extending to crown. Black collar Feet pink The distinctive call - a loud rattling "churr" - is uttered by both sexes

Activities
It roosts by day in a variety of sheltered sites in the traditional hollow in trees

Feeding
At night it forages mainly by pouncing on terrestrial insects from a low perch, and also attacks Moths in flight (hence it is sometimes called a "Moth Owl")

Nesting & Breeding
These birds breed between August and December, and build a nest in tree hollows They lay a number of eggs (2 to 5) which take 27 to 29 days to hatch. Both parents help out with caring for the eggs and then for the chicks. After fledging (25 days) they stay for several months with their parents.



OWL LINKS
The Owl Pages - Owls of Australia
Australian Owls (PDF format)
Lou's Owl Page
Brazilian Owl Pages



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