Compiled from material held in the Railway Resource Centre and other sources

  Published 17th July, 2005Vol. 2 No. 29  

Contents
Click the stars to jump
BY-GONE DAYS IN COLOUR
HERITAGE POSTER
CARTOON
AUSTRALIA'S FIRST DOUBLE DECK TRAIN BEGINS SERVICE
"GARRATT" TYPE LOCOMOTIVES FOR L.M.S.R.
NEW CARS FOR NORTHERN ALABAMA
RAILWAY COMFORT AND DISCOMFORT
THE RAILWAYS OF GERMANY
TRAIN HOSTESSES OF THE NSWGR
CONVERTED STEAM LOCOMOTIVE IS A USEFUL SUBURBAN UNIT
POSTCARD FROM AFAR
AN ODD SPOT
NEXT WEEK'S ISSUE


BY-GONE DAYS IN COLOUR
Goodwin Alco locomotive 932 heads The Overland through the Mt. Lofty Range towards Adelaide, S.A.

THIS WEEK'S HERITAGE POSTER

THIS WEEK'S CARTOON


N.S.W.
AUSTRALIA'S FIRST DOUBLE DECK TRAIN BEGINS SERVICE
     Australia's first complete double deck train began regular service in Sydney recently.
     The eight-carriage train holds 2,100 passengers — nearly 1,000 more than a single deck train.
     Seating capacity on the double deck train is increased from 516 on single deck trains to 976, an improvement of just under 90 per cent.
     The introduction of double deck trains, believed to be the first of their type in the world, will usher in a new era of comfortable travel for suburban passengers.
     The new trains will operate throughout the metropolitan area mainly on heavily patronised services.
     In off-peak periods, it can be divided into four-carriage or two-carriage sets.
     Tenders will be called in 1969 for a substantial number of new motorised double deck carriages when trials of the four prototypes are completed.
     Each of the four prototype motor carriages has different electrical equipment and power bogies; eight different manufacturers supply the components.
     The trials will determine which prototype has the best combination of electrical and bogie equipment.
     Since last June, when the first prototype was delivered, the Department has been carrying out extensive testing of the prototypes, and they are now being tested under normal service conditions.
     The power carriages to be ordered will be combined with the 120 trailer carriages already in service.
     Special features of the double deck train are air suspension bogies, automatic doors, fluorescent lighting and improved seating and insulation.
     Double deck trains will increase carrying capacity in peak periods without using longer trains which would involve costly alterations to platforms, tracks and signals.
     Despite the similarity in appearance between the power and trailer Carriages, Departmental designers have incorporated more than 12 tons of additional electrical equipment in each power carriage.
Reprinted from The Railwayman, February, 1969

U.K.
"GARRATT" TYPE LOCOMOTIVES FOR L.M.S.R.
First Articulated Engines employed for Main Line Long Distance Services on Home Railways.
     The directors of the London Midland and Scottish Railway Company several months ago placed with Beyer, Peacock and Co., Limited, of Gorton Foundry, Manchester, the contract for the manufacture of three "Garratt" articulated locomotives according to the builders' patents and to the special requirements of Sir Henry Fowler, K.B.E., the chief mechanical engineer of the London Midland and Scottish Railway Company.
     These three locomotives have now been delivered, and at the outset have been in service in working mineral trains between Toton and Brent (Cricklewood) on the Midland Division, although we understand their use is not to be limited to this route, as full advantage has been taken of the wheelbase and axle loading to permit of these engines being worked where required on the L.M.S.R. system.
     A large grate area (44.5 sq. ft.) is provided for the boiler and to facilitate dropping the fire, drop fire grates have been provided which are operated from the cab by means of a hand lever. The heating surface is:—
Tubes
l,954sq. ft.
Firebox
183 sq. ft.
 
2,137sq.ft.
Superheater
500 sq. ft.
Total
2,637 sq. ft.
     As the design of heavy articulated locomotives is somewhat of a novelty to standard main line English practice, due regard had necessarily to be paid to the provision of standard fittings for the boiler, superheater and engine parts, whilst the standard diameter (5ft. 3in.) of the coupled wheels has been retained. Each engine is provided with a Dreadnought ejector and is piped throughout, steam brakes being fitted to all the coupled wheels and to the leading two-wheeled bogies. The application of the brake is controlled by the operation of the driver's brake valve in the usual manner. A hand-brake is provided on all the coupled wheels, controlled from the cab. Special fittings comprise Gresham & Craven's injectors No. 13 in No. 12 cases, "Silvertown" mechanical lubrication to the cylinders, coupled axleboxes and ball joints, "Ross" patent safety valves, "Parry" tube cleaner, and steam sanding gear, whilst the boiler, and cylinders are clothed with asbestos mattresses. In the event of these "Garratt" type locomotives being required for through working, water pick-up scoops have been provided for each tank, the scoops being operated by one screw gear from the cab. The scoops are so arranged that water can be picked up when running in either direction. The overall wheelbase is 79ft., but the locomotives operate satisfactorily in either direction, so that no special turntables are necessary. The total weight of each of the locomotives, with 7 tons of coal and 4,500 gallons of water, is 148 tons 15 cwt. At 75 per cent. of the boiler pressure (190 lb.) the tractive effort is 40,260 lb. and at 85 per cent. 45,260 lb. The tractive power is 282.5 lb. per 1 lb. M.E.P. in the cylinders.
     These three "Garratt" locomotives are the first of this or any other form of articulated type of engine to be built for long distance traffic working on any main line railway system in Great Britain, although some two years ago Beyer, Peacock and Co., Limited, constructed a larger and heavier "Garratt" locomotive (of the 2-8-0 + 0-8-2 wheel arrangement) to the requirements of Mr. H. N. Gresley, the chief mechanical engineer of the London and North Eastern Railway. This engine, which was a notable feature in the locomotive display at Darlington in connection with the Railway Centenary Celebrations, July 2nd, 1925, was designed and built specifically for "banking" purposes and has since been used in this capacity at the mineral marshalling yards of the L.N.E.R. at Wath, South Yorkshire.
Reprinted from The Beyer-Peacock Quarterly Review, July, 1927

U.S.A.
NEW CARS FOR NORTHERN ALABAMA
     A shipment of closed cars has been made from the works of the American Car Company for operation on the lines of the North Alabama Traction Company, of North Decatur, Alabama. The conditions governing the distribution of traffic at Decatur are peculiar, the city being practically divided into five towns with a combined population of about 16,000. The point of transfer is in Central New Decatur at the new car house which has been completed recently; the main building is 90 ft. x 140 ft., with a 50-ft. x 140-ft. addition conforming to the street. At South New Decatur is located the company's amusement park, and the amusements are free. The new cars are of the drop-sash variety and are mounted on the No. 21-E single trucks with a wheel base of 7 ft. Two partitions are provided for the purpose of separating colored passengers from white. These partitions can be placed at any location desired, eyes being placed at each post and in a corresponding place under the seat for their reception. The interiors are finished in cherry. The chief dimensions are: Length over the end panels, 18 ft., and over the vestibules 28 ft.; width over the sills, 7 ft., and over the posts at belt, 7 ft. 8 ins.; the side sills are 3¾ ins. x 7 ins., and there is a sub-sill reinforced with 3½-in. x 6-in. angle iron; the end sills are 3½ ins, x 6 ins.; center sills, 3¾ ins, x 5¼ ins.
Reprinted from Street Railway Journal, 12 January, 1907

U.K.
RAILWAY COMFORT AND DISCOMFORT
By JOHN PHILLIMORE
     Comfort and discomfort are matters of degree. Although the railways in this country have not yet been able to restore fully the high order of comfort enjoyed before the war — a good deal of which was taken for granted — much is being accomplished in difficult circumstances. Better lighting, improved meal facilities, and quicker and more frequent services, are again apparent, and a wonderful standard of safety remains unimpaired. It may help some travellers, who are inclined to grumble at existing conditions, to become philosophical if they realise how our forebears suffered and how cheerfully they bore their trials on the iron way. An example which well illustrates the point is to be found in a letter dated July 22, 1837, and addressed "To the Directors of the Birmingham Railway Office, Cornhill" from "24 Greek St. Soho." The London & Birmingham Railway was opened for public traffic from Euston to Boxmoor — a section of 24½ miles — only on July 20, 1837, and the complete line was not ready till 1838. Our correspondent was therefore almost a pioneer, and one can capture some of his feeling and of the general atmosphere of adventure when starting off from Euston in a train which was hauled up the incline — too steep for locomotives — as far as Camden by endless rope and winding engine. Incidentally, this steep grade was not undertaken by locomotive until 1844. The letter reads:—
     Gentlemen, — I really think you ought to take some means to prevent the burning cinders from your engines flying in the faces of persons travelling by your conveyance as I think great injury is likely to accrue therefrom. I am at present suffering much inconvenience from the dust blown into my eyes yesterday on a journey to Boxmoor, and the enclosed cinder fell within my shirt collar in a burning state and caused a blister to rise which, although not serious, is very unpleasant, and I conceive had it blown into my eye might have deprived me of sight. Trusting you will endeavour to remedy this evil which I think may be easily done by placing wire gauze or something else at back of the top of the flue.—Yours obdurately., E. W. Watson."
     The enclosure of the offending cinder is a delightful touch. It is a pity that it has not been preserved in the museum at Euston! Clearly "outside" passengers had their troubles, but even the opulent insiders were not very well off for comfort, for they had to provide their candle and patent folding holder if they wished to spare themselves the blackout. These holders were provided with a swivelling hook which the owner jabbed into the upholstery with, I should imagine, a good chance of hot wax running down his neck. Journeys then were a succession of jolts.
     Obtaining a wartime passport would appear to be easy compared to the acquisition of a railway ticket in 1830 to travel on the Liverpool & Manchester Railway. An intending passenger had to give notice at least on the previous day, and state not only name and address but such particulars as place of birth and reason for travelling. Smoking in trains and on the platforms was strictly forbidden for many years and any offender caught after a second warning was removed from the company's premises and forfeited his fare. What Lords of Creation were the early railway directors; what small fry was the railway traveller!
     "No gratuities" was a rule of the companies. Here the railway servant of today may in turn contrast his lot and also on the score of freedom of action and cold comfort as shown up by a petition signed by 634 members of the staff of the S.E.R. and presented in November, 1877, "To John Shaw Esqre., General Manager and Secretary of the South Eastern Railway Company." This reads:—
     "WE THE UNDERSIGNED being Inspectors, Guards, Ticket Collectors, and other Employés in the service of the South Eastern Railway Company having been heretofore prohibited from wearing Moustachios by the Rules of the Company's Service and believing and being advised, that the wearing of Moustachios is a protection against the inclemency of the weather, and for divers other good reasons, BEG MOST RESPECTFULLY to solicit your aid in abrogating or obtaining the abrogation of the aforesaid prohibitory Rule, by your doing which, you will confer on us a great benefit, for which we shall be most grateful."
     How would the trades union of today deal with such a weighty petition?
Reprinted from The Railway Gazette, 9 February, 1940

Germany
THE RAILWAYS OF GERMANY
     The Official German News Agency stated on May 29 that railways and other means of transport were occupied to such an extent that Allied prisoners of war had to march all the way from the front to the prison camps in Germany. The Swiss newspaper Démocrate de Delémont stated on May 26 that Black Forest resorts are full of German wounded, and added that, during the passage of ambulance trains, air raid sirens were sounded so that civilians were kept indoors. According to the Tribune de Genève of June 2, the frequent arrival of trains of wounded soldiers is causing discontent in Bohemia and Sudetenland, whose inhabitants are ignorant of the fate of their sons and husbands who have enlisted in the German Forces.
     According to the Lithuanian Ministry of Communications, the Reichsbahn informed Lithuania on June 4 that the transport of goods to and from Switzerland via Germany was suspended by reason of the heavy internal traffic the German railways were conveying. On May 23 the Latvian Railways ceased accepting transit traffic for Switzerland and Italy via Germany.
     The railway on the right bank of the Rhine between Mülheim and Basle is still reported to be closed. It is understood that passengers, German newspapers, and light goods destined for Switzerland are conveyed by motor vehicle to Lörrach, and that heavy goods have been diverted to the Singen and Schaffhausen route. It is stated that the only traffic from Germany passing by rail through Basle is coal for Italy. ,
     It is reported that a recent Decree issued by the Reichsbahn orders all lubricating oil to be removed from rolling stock, both German and foreign, before it leaves German territory.
Reprinted from The Railway Gazette, 21 June, 1940

N.S.W.
TRAIN HOSTESSES OF THE NSWGR

Lida Kloczko photographed at work on North Coast Daylight Express.
     Although hostesses have been on duty on the trains of the NSWGR for over 25 years, very few of the general public are aware that this service exists.
     But exist it does, and the hostesses, in their distinctive green uniforms, are rostered for service on five of the Department's air-conditioned trains — Intercapital Daylight Express, Riverina Express, Central West Express, North Coast Daylight Express and Northern Tablelands Express.
     The first hostesses began duties in November, 1941, and their numbers since then have increased from the original eight until today there is a fixed staff of 18.
     In the early days, hostesses worked only three trains, Riverina Express, Central West Express and Northern Tablelands Express.
     However, when the other two trains were brought into service, the operations of the train hostesses were extended to cover the new services.
Duties
     It should be understood that hostesses are in no way connected with the catering staff on the trains but that their widely varied duties are geared to the sole purpose of increasing passengers' comfort by giving whatever assistance they can.
     The hostesses (one hostess accompanies each of the five trains mentioned on every trip) patrol the trains frequently to ensure the comfort of each passenger; they especially attend to the aged, to invalids, to mothers with children and children travelling alone; they inquire about luggage arrangements and wherever necessary co-opt the assistance of the Corridor Attendant to handle passengers' luggage; they render first-aid to passengers if necessary; they provide a tray service to those passengers unable to get to the Buffet Dining Car; and they perform a host of other equally important functions.
     Vacancies for hostesses are filled from applications made in response to advertisements in the daily Press and the Departments Weekly Notices.
     As these positions are filled by public examination, it is not possible for a Railway employee to become a hostess other than by selection after submitting an application when the advertisements appear.
     The most recent appointment illustrates this point.
     Miss Lida Kloczko joined the Railways in October, 1960, and worked as a shorthand typist until a few months ago when she saw an advertisement for hostesses in the Weekly Notices and decided to apply.
     She was accepted and not long afterwards began her new job.
     Like all applicants, Lida is unmarried, between the ages of 21 and 30, and is qualified in first-aid.
Reprinted from The Railwayman, June, 1967

W.A.
CONVERTED STEAM LOCOMOTIVE IS A USEFUL SUBURBAN UNIT
     Extra power has been given a suburban tank engine, used on Perth suburban lines, through a conversion from a Pacific to a 4-6-4T, and results from its performance since August last show an interesting improvement in rapid acceleration and service.
     Conversion was carried out at the WAGR Midland Shops, and consisted mainly of extending the main frames to carry an oil bunker at the back of the cab, which was redesigned, and the provision of side tanks for water supplies.
     Tests of a U-class locomotive in suburban working in July, 1956, determined most of the design data necessary in the conversion. It was found that in order to work two suburban rosters without refuelling the capacity of the oil bunker would have to be 1000 gallons.
     No changes have been made in the boiler, which carries steam at 380lb. working pressure and has a total evaporative heating surface of 1385 sq. ft., of which the firebox and 18-element superheater contribute 142 and 260 sq. ft. respectively. The grate area is 26 sq. ft. However, the boiler was given a thorough overhaul and modified sufficiently to incorporate standard W-class boiler mountings.
     Cylinder dimensions remain at 18in. x 24in., driving wheels are 46in. diameter, and the starting-tractive effort is 22,032lbs., the same as for the U-class.
     Weight in working order is 79.8 tons, of which 45.5 tons are available for adhesion. The trailing truck was replaced by a four-wheel bogie carried on 30in. diameter wheels, and the side tanks running along the full length of the boiler have a capacity of 2000 gallons of water.
     As converted the locomotive, numbered 664, re-coded UT, weighs 79.8 tons, compared with the engine-only weight of 58 tons for the original U-class locomotives, and the 72.6 tons for the Dm class 4-6-4 suburban tank engines. The total weight on the coupled wheels is 4 tons greater that of the original U-class locomotives.
     The fourteen U-class locomotives had been originally built by the North British Locomotive Co. for the British Ministry for Munitions and intended for war service on the Soudan Railways, were equipped to use oil fuel when they were supplied to the WAGR in 1946-47. The oil burning equipment has been retained in the converted engine in order to meet suburban running requirements.
     Following an initial workshops trial on June 27, UT 664 was assigned to suburban working two weeks later. During the first few days the performance of the locomotive was closely watched and fuel and water consumption figures were recorded when hauling loads of up to four cars, about 74 tons. Average fuel oil and water consumption of 4.25 gallons per mile and 36 gallons per mile respectively were measured. These figures give the locomotive a maximum range of 230 miles on a full bunker of oil, and water sufficient for a run of 50 miles.
     UT 664 was found to accelerate smartly and showed itself capable of maintaining suburban railcar schedules without trouble, the most difficult run being from Perth to Fremantle, 11.8 miles, in 34 minutes, including 14 stops, a scheduled average speed of 21.4 m.p.h. Average running speed for this run, based on 20-second stops, is 23.8 m.p.h..
Reprinted from Railway Transportation, January, 1958


POSTCARD FROM AFAR

Keihan Electric Railway, Japan

AN ODD SPOT

CityRail cuts lead to slight overcrowding on peak-hour services

NEXT WEEK

  • FIRST OF NSWGR'S M.U. INTERURBAN ELECTRIC SETS ON MOUNTAIN RUN
  • REPLANNED SYDNEY STATION TO EQUAL BEST OF OVERSEAS
  • THE MANCHESTER SHIP CANAL
  • PARIS STRIKE
  • ELECTRIFICATION OF THE METROPOLITAN AND THE DISTRICT RAILWAYS
  • FLYING HAMBURGER - WHAT OFFERS?
  • EVERYDAY ESSENTIALS IN RAILWAY WORKING
  • WATER TRAINS
  • EASTERN AND WESTERN SUBURBS RAILWAYS

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