Compiled from material held in the Railway Resource Centre and other sources

  Published 31st July, 2005Vol. 2 No. 31  

Contents
Click the stars to jump
BY-GONE DAYS IN COLOUR
HERITAGE POSTER
CARTOON
UNDER 13½ HOUR SYDNEY—MELBOURNE SCHEDULE PLANNED
OBERON BRANCH DIESELISED
"BEYER-GARRATT" LOCOMOTIVES FOR N.Z. RAILWAYS
ELEVATED RAILWAY PROPOSED FOR SAN FRANCISCO
FIRST OF MANY
TEMORA MAN CLAIMS CREDIT FOR RAIL GAUGE INVENTION
POSTCARD FROM AFAR
AN ODD SPOT
NEXT WEEK'S ISSUE


BY-GONE DAYS IN COLOUR
A 57-class leads a goods train past Enfield North Signal Box as it begins its journey across the Blue Mountains of New South Wales.

THIS WEEK'S HERITAGE POSTER

THIS WEEK'S CARTOON


N.S.W. & Vic.
UNDER 13½ HOUR SYDNEY—MELBOURNE SCHEDULE PLANNED
     First shots in the "war" between the railways and bus lines for the lucrative passenger traffic between Sydney and Melbourne was fired by the announcement of a daylight express train between the two cities to commence on March 26.
     Stemming from the voiding of restrictions on the operation of interstate road services under Section 92 of the Commonwealth Constitution, the railways' response is an attempt to bring back custom through the operation of comfortable air-conditioned trains with buffet service on this important route.
     As with the interstate express freights the new trains will be operated by diesel-electric locomotives and cut the journey time by 125 minutes south bound and 77 minutes north-bound.
     The new schedule is as follows: Leave Sydney on Monday, Wednesday, Friday at 7.45 a.m.; Albury arrive 5.07 p.m. (change trains), depart 5.23 p.m.; Melbourne arrive 9.05 p.m. North-bound leave Melbourne at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday; Albury arrive 11.50 a.m., depart 12.05 p.m.; Sydney arrive 9.25 p.m.
     Overall times are 13 hours 20 minutes southbound and 13 hours 25 minutes northbound, the fastest times yet provided by surface transport for this 590-mile inter-capital journey, and considerably better than the best pre-war times of 14 hours 40 minutes and 14 hours 25 minutes respectively, current in 1939. On the slightly faster southbound trip the average speed, including stops, will be 44 m.p.h.
     On the NSWGR trains will call at Strathfield, and engine crews will be changed at Goulburn and Junee, and it is possible that stops will be made at certain points too, for passengers to or from Melbourne.
     An air-conditioned car set of the RUB type will be assigned to this service accommodating 74 first-class and 212 second-class passengers and a 27-seat diner-buffet car will be included in the formation. Total weight of the train is 348 tons and it will be hauled by one of the Clyde-built 42-class 1750 h.p. diesel-electric locomotives.
     On the Victorian side the south-bound connecting train will run non-stop between Albury and Melbourne and average 51½ m.p.h. for the 190.5-mile run. The northbound service will be somewhat slower as it will have to cross the southbound Spirit of Progress at, probably, Locksley.
     A B-class 1500 h.p. diesel-electric locomotive will head a train of AS and BS cars and a buffet car, having accommodation for a similar number of passengers.
     At present competing road services offer five services per day between Sydney and Melbourne, 561 miles by the direct route with times ranging from 18 hours 40 minutes to l9 hours 30 minutes, with overnight running. Fares are set at £4/10/- to £4/-/- single and £7/5/- to £7/-/- return. Second class rail fares (including booked seats) are £4/11/6 single and £7/6/- return on the air-conditioned Daylight service and it is expected that it will be a yardstick for the introduction of similar trains in the future. Already discussions are taking place between the VR and SAR in respect to projected day trains between Melbourne and Adelaide.
Reprinted from Railway Transportation, March, 1956

N.S.W.
OBERON BRANCH DIESELISED
     The Tarana-Oberon line on January 21 became completely dieselised when "49" Class diesel-electric locomotives replaced the "19" Class steam locomotives used previously.
     To mark the end of steam traction on this scenic branch line, nearly 400 members of the Australian Railway Historical Society and other rail fans on March 9 travelled from Sydney to Oberon.
     Between Penrith and Wallerawang, the 403-ton train was hauled by two C.38 Class locomotives, and made history as the heaviest steam-hauled passenger train ever to cross the Blue Mountains.
     The train on which the rail fans travelled from Tarana to Oberon was hauled by two "19" Class locomotives and is pictured in the accompanying photograph.
Reprinted from The Railwayman, March/April, 1963

New Zealand
"BEYER-GARRATT" LOCOMOTIVES FOR N.Z. RAILWAYS
     These engines represent a remarkable example of advanced design for locomotives built on the Garratt articulated principle and for the 3 ft. 6 in. gauge.
     A "Beyer-Garratt" 4-6-2 + 2-6-4 type express locomotive, one of an order for three recently completed by Beyer, Peacock & Co, Ltd. for the New Zealand Government Railways, of which Mr. G. S. Lynde is the Chief Mechanical Engineer.
     These are remarkable engines in every way, and may be said to represent yet another advance in Garratt locomotive design and construction.
     The locomotive is equipped with six cylinders — that is to say, each group of wheels is driven by three cylinders — to which superheated steam is distributed by piston valves actuated by Walschaerts gearing. The Gresley system is employed for actuating the inside valve by means of a combining lever, and the valves work with a maximum cut-off of 50 per cent. Steam reversing gear is fitted.
     Full advantage is taken in this design of the opportunity afforded by the Garratt system of construction for employing ample boiler and firebox proportions. The boiler barrel has an outside diameter of 6 ft. 6 in., its length being 12 ft. It contains 43 superheater flue tubes, 5¼ in. diameter outside, and 224 fire tubes, 1¾ in. diameter outside. The firebox is of the round-topped pattern and has a grate area of 5 8.3 sq. ft., this grate being arranged with rocking firebars mechanically operated. The ash-pan is of the hopper type with cleaning doors at the sides and below. Feed water is supplied to the boiler by a top feed device, and three Ross patent "pop" safety valves are mounted above the firebox.
     The principal dimensions are as follow:—
Gauge of rails3ft. 6in.
Cylinders (6) - diameter16½in.
Cylinders - piston stroke24in.
Wheels, coupled – diameter4ft. 9in.
Wheels, end bogies – diameter2ft. 6½in.
Wheels, radial bogie – diameter2ft 9in.
Wheelbase (each group)25ft. 5in.
Wheelbase total76ft. 7½in.
Boiler heating surface — Tubes2,008 sq. ft.
Boiler heating surface — Firebox  266 sq. ft.
 2,274 sq. ft.
Superheater520 sq. ft.
Combined total Heating Surface2,794 sq. ft.
 
Boiler pressure200 lb. per sq. in.
Tractive power, at 75% boiler pressure51,580 lb.
Ratio of tractive force (at 75% b.p.) to adhesive weight (tanks full)1 to 3.8
Weight in working order145 tons 14 cwt. 3 qrs.
Maximum weight on one axle14 tons 13 cwt.
Coal capacity of bunker6 tons
Combined water capacity of tanks4,000 gallons
     The firebox is fitted with two Nicholson thermic syphons, and firing is effected by means of a Duplex mechanical stoker.
     The equipment of the locomotive includes the following fittings: M.L.S. superheater; air sanding gear to front and rear of each group of coupled wheels; one Sellars' injector and one Davies & Metcaife exhaust-steam injector delivering through top-feed clack-boxes; Detroit lubricators for cylinders, brake pump, and mechanical stoker; Wakefield mechanical lubricators for ball joints; Franklin grease lubrication, and special Stone's bronze bearings for coupled axles; grease lubrication and special Stone's bronze bearings for connecting and coupling rods; Pyle National electric head and cab lights; Gresley valve gear for working the inside valve; steam reversing gear; Locomotive Stoker Company's duplex "D.4" mechanical stoker; Nicholson thermic syphons in firebox; Flannery stays for firebox; Ross "pop" safety valves; train-heating apparatus; Hendrie by-pass valves; United States metallic packings.
     Speaking generally, this locomotive represents a very interesting and, indeed, skilful piece of designing work, and may be said to embody the latest development in Garratt locomotive practice. Considerable difficulties necessarily arise with the 3ft. 6in. gauge owing to the limited distance between the frames and also in this instance the very limited height available.
     The working in of the mechanical stoker has been obtained in a very satisfactory manner, the coal bunker being fitted on the boiler cradle, which latter has been extended to accommodate it. The restricted height of the engine — namely, 11ft. 6in. from rail level — also had the effect of emphasising the difficulties encountered in designing the cab owing to insufficient head-room, but inspection of the locomotive will show that here, as elsewhere, everything has been satisfactorily arranged.
     The locomotives are intended for working heavy mail trains on the New Zealand Railways to replace double heading and banking. The specification called for the ability to negotiate three chain curves, also for the achievement of a speed on the level of 50 m.p.h. and the negotiation of grades of 1 in 40. The design of the locomotive exemplifies in a very striking manner the extent to which the Garratt articulated principle can be usefully applied and the development possible, particularly on narrow gauges. Considerable attention has been given to the matter of accessibility, the tanks being raised to effect this result.
     The arrival of these locomotives in New Zealand has created much interest both amongst railwaymen and the general public. The engines have been assembled in the Hutt Shops of the railway, and their success in service is confidently awaited.
Reprinted from The Beyer-Peacock Quarterly Review, April, 1929

U.S.A.
ELEVATED RAILWAY PROPOSED FOR SAN FRANCISCO
     The plan of having an elevated railway along the water front of San Francisco, which has been suggested before, has again been broached. The present plan is to build an elevated railroad for the transportation of freight and passengers from the northern end of the city to the southern end, the project involving an expenditure of $5,000,000. Under existing conditions, it is very difficult to get freight from the North Beach district across Market Street; it is also exceedingly difficult to have freight handled within the city limits except by drayage or by water. Passenger transportation between the north and south sections is also greatly hindered by the present condition of the streets. It is to relieve these conditions that the new road has been proposed. The route of the proposed road will be along North Beach, through the wholesale district, crossing Market Street on a viaduct, following the water front, through the Potrero and down south as far as Visitacion Valley. It is purposed to handle passengers over the elevated tracks during the daytime and freight at night. Owing to the freedom from obstruction the trains will be able to make fast time and will afford a ready avenue for freight exchange.
Reprinted from Street Railway Journal, 9 February, 1907

United Kingdom
FIRST OF MANY
     June 3 was an auspicious date for British Railways if not for Britain's railfans. On that day the first main-line diesel locomotive ordered under the huge BR modernization plan was handed over to the system by the builders, English Electric Company Limited. The first of Britain's new mainline power turned out to be a rather ordinary 1000 h.p. mixed traffic unit — one of 20 which will be used principally for freight duties on the London Midland Region. The design incorporates no revolutionary ideas but is a neat specimen of a diesel workhorse, powered by an English Electric 8SVT 8-cyclinder engine developing 1000 h.p. at 850 r.p.m. The direct-coupled main generator supplies current to four traction motors mounted on the two 4-wheeled trucks.
     The locomotives come under power category A and can be run in multiple-unit with other similar ones or with those of category B or C, regardless of whether they have been built by English Electric or other manufacturers. It has a length of 43 feet, a weight of 72 tons, a tractive effort of 42,000 pounds and a maximum service speed of 75 mph.
     Elsewhere in Britain this summer, the diesel has been showing itself. Diesel railcar trains have taken over branch lines in many areas. Earlier in the year, intercity diesel trains had been introduced on the Edinburgh-Glasgow services. Basically similar trains have also started running between Birmingham and Wales. On the Southern Region, a number of passenger schedules between London, Tonbridge and Hastings passed into the hands of 1000 h.p. diesel-electric trains. Services on this line — beset by a very restricted loading gauge and many grades — have been a sore point with commuters. Now the diesels have also caused complaints from on-line residents and passengers: they are too noisy.
Reprinted from Trains, October, 1957

N.S.W.
TEMORA MAN CLAIMS CREDIT FOR RAIL GAUGE INVENTION
     A device recently claimed to be of Russian origin may have been invented by a Temora man. The invention allows railway vans to change from one gauge to the other without having their wheels and bogies changed.
     With it, a van may be shunted directly from a line of one gauge to that of another.
     Although the description of the Russian invention is vague, it appears remarkably similar to a patent applied for by a Temora resident half a century ago.
     The patent was granted to a Mr A. Warwick, of Temora, in 1914.
     News of the Russian claim appeared in the Sydney Morning Herald on June 12 this year.
     Under the heading, "Russia Beats Rail Gauge Problem", the report said:-
ANSWER
     "Russia may have found the answer to Australia's railway gauge problem.
     "A recent discovery has enabled a train to cross from Russia into Poland for the first time without having its wheels and bogies changed.
     "The goods train was fitted with special wheels and axles that narrowed and expanded the wheel gauge as it passed over a special stretch of track at the border.
     "Travelling from east to west the track gradually narrowed, automatically squeezing the wheels closer together until they fitted the 3½-inch narrower European track.
     "Going the other way, the gauge of the wheels automatically widens."
ANOTHER CLAIM
     Meanwhile, a Roseville, N.S.W., man has also claimed that a similar invention had been developed in Australia during the 1930s.
     The man, Mr R. S. Adams said, "I know because I put money into it."
     Mr Adams said that a scale working model showing the device in action had been on display for some time at Anthony Hordern and Sons, Sydney.
     Thousands of people had seen it, he said.
     The promoters had tried hard to sell the idea to various Australian State Governments, but without success, he said.
     The main objection raised was that the cost of converting existing rolling stock bogies would be too great.
     "At one time we had hopes of selling the rights of its use to the railways of Brazil, but again failed. I suppose the patent has lapsed now, and it is quite probable that Russia has copied and adopted the idea. I destroyed my scrip a few years ago," Mr Adams said.
     A description of the Temora invention appeared in the Temora Independent of January 24, 1914.
WAR TRAFFIC
     At the time the invention appeared, Australia was faced with the difficulty of moving a hitherto undreamed of number of troops quickly, and the inadequacies of the different gauges was apparent.
     The Temora Independent said:- "In the December issue of the Australian Official Journal of Patents appears the illustration of Mr A. Warwick's patent No. 9070, for a change of railway gauge, together with a short description of same.
     "This invention is claimed to get over the difficulty of enabling a train to run on tracks of different gauges. The cars are fitted with wheels, having inwardly sloping treads and inner and outer flanges.
     "The rails are formed with slots at the cross-over to enable the outer flanges to pass over intersecting rails. This invention also provides for the inter-State cars to be intermixed with the State trains and shunted across the border without interfering with existing traffic.
     "Judging by the opinions already expressed of this patent, it should commend itself to the favourable consideration of the authorities."
Reprinted from The Railwayman, August-September, 1961


POSTCARD FROM AFAR

Wolfsbergkogel, Semmering Pass, Austria

AN ODD SPOT

It sure cuts down on fuel costs!

NEXT WEEK

  • FIRST TGR DIESEL-HYDRAULIC LOCO COMPLETES TRIALS
  • SPOTLIGHT ON THE TIN PLATE EXPRESS
  • THE QUEEN'S VISIT TO IRELAND
  • SIGNALLING AT SHRUB HILL CROSSING
  • FORGOTTEN RULES
  • RESULT OF HIGH SPEED ON THE FRENCH RAILWAYS
  • EASTERN SUBURBS RAILWAY COMPLETION NOT LIKELY

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